Saturday, November 23, 2013

SMASH THE BIG BOSSES!



Swiss GDP consists mostly of  medium-sized companies which do not pay huge salaries to their bosses.

On 24 November 2013, Switzerland holds a referendum on reforms that would make it illegal for Swiss companies to give bosses more than 12 times the wage of their lowest earning workers.

In 1998, the top salaries at the largest Swiss companies stood at 14 times those of the lowest-paid workers.

By 2011, the top salaries at the largest Swiss companies stood at 93 times those of the lowest-paid workers.

When big companies are run by greedy pigs, trouble follows.


It is the companies paying giant salaries, such as Credit Suisse and UBS, which have been 'badly managed' and which have got Switzerland into trouble.

By 2003, the Swiss economy was under some stress and there were a number of bankruptcies and "massive layoffs and dismissals."

Among the reasons for this were:

1. The Global economic crisis, partly caused by 'the greedy pigs' grabbing more than their fare share of the world's wealth.

2. The ordinary Swiss family getting less than their fair share of the cake and feeling that they had less money to spend.


Peter Brabeck, chairman of the Swiss firm Nestlé, earns 12 times more than the chairman of the Anglo-Dutch firm Unilever. 

In 2011, Switzerland had the world's highest average wealth per adult, at USD 540,000.

However, wealth in Switzerland is now distributed very unequally.


Urs Rohner, the chairman of Credit Suisse earns more than the chairmen of Barclays, BNP, Deutsche Bank and Royal Bank of Scotland combined.

In The Financial Times, James Breiding writes that Switzerland has been the most competitive country in the world due to having "strong industry and weak government, with low levels of regulation."

(In 2003 Switzerland's real GDP contracted by 0.2%.)

James Breiding is the author of ‘Swiss Made: The Untold Story Behind Switzerland’s Success’.

Switzerland has attracted multinationals, including Google, consumer goods company Procter and Gamble, commodities traders such as Cargill, Glencore and Louis Dreyfus, and hedge funds such as Brevan Howard.



However, these companies do not necessarily employ large numbers of Swiss citizens, and do not necessarily pay much in tax.

These multinationals do not necessarily do much to enrich the average Swiss citizen. 

If chief executives' pay is capped at about $500,000 per year, Switzerland might get rid of some of the greedier hedge fund managers and bank executives.

 
It is the companies paying giant salaries, such as Credit Suisse and UBS, which have been 'badly managed' have got Switzerland into trouble.

Some of the top executives in Switzerland would appear to very greedy.

Peter Brabeck, chairman of the Swiss firm Nestlé, earns 12 times more than the chairman of the Anglo-Dutch firm Unilever. 

Walter Kielholz, chairman of reinsurer Swiss Re, earns 10 times the salary of Germany's Munich Re.

Urs Rohner, the chairman of Credit Suisse earns more than the chairmen of Barclays, BNP, Deutsche Bank and Royal Bank of Scotland combined.

http://www.ft.com/


Swiss GDP consists mostly of  medium-sized companies which do not pay huge salaries to their bosses.

If one or two hedge funds were to leave Switzerland, it would not be the end of the world.

Swiss GDP consists mostly of  medium-sized companies which do not pay huge salaries to their bosses.

These medium-sized companies are world-class.

It is the companies paying giant salaries, such as Credit Suisse and UBS, which have been 'badly managed' and which have got Switzerland into trouble.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2511657/Six-British-soldiers-held-Indian-jail-authorities-claim-ship-carrying-huge-cache-illegal-weapons.html

Anonymous said...

Walmart's Now Ex-CEO To Pocket $113 Million Pension, 6182 Times Greater Than Average WMT Worker's 401(k) Balance

From the comment section:

Ever on the lookout for ways to slash costs, Walmart (WMT) executives have found yet another place to trim: After nearly 40 years, the retail behemoth is eliminating profit-sharing payouts to workers. This is one of those maneuvers that makes the bottom line look better in the short term, but could have insidious negative effects in the long run.

Instead of the profit-sharing plan, which added as much as 4 percent to workers' pay at the always-profitable chain, Walmart will offer an up to 6 percent match on funds workers deposit into their company 401(k) retirement accounts. The beauty of this seemingly magnanimous offer is that many low-paid retail workers don't participate in retirement plans.Bloomberg reports retail companies generally see lower-than-average participation rates, and the average is 75 percent.

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-11-25/walmarts-now-ex-ceo-pocket-113-million-pension-6182-times-greater-average-wmt-worker

 
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