Sunday, November 03, 2013

FUKUSHIMA - PANIC



"Experts at Canada’s Vancouver Aquarium say they are puzzled by what is causing thousands of sunflower starfish, or sea stars, to die in the waters of Vancouver Harbor and Howe Sound...

"While many people assume that the ocean will dilute the Fukushima radiation, a previously-secret 1955 U.S. government report concluded that the ocean may not adequately dilute radiation from nuclear accidents, and there could be “pockets” and “streams” of highly-concentrated radiation...

"A team of top Chinese scientists has just published a study in the Science China Earth Sciences journal showing that the radioactive plume crosses the ocean in a nearly straight line toward North America, and that it appears to stay together with little dispersion..

"Bluefin tuna on the California shore tested positive for radiation from Fukushima..."

According to the Center for Research on Globalization: ‎Fukushima Radiation Levels Will Concentrate in Pockets at Specific US and Canada West Coast Locations



A number of websites WRONGLY stated that the above diagram shows radiation from Fukushima.

In reality, this diagram was produced in 2011.

It was made by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to show the tsunami of 11 March 2011, based on data recorded in the Pacific. 

NOAA website

This is explained by Audrey Garric at le monde on 29 Oct 2013 (also Le blog de Wendy)



In a study published this month in the journal Deep-Sea Research, scientists have studied the path in the ocean of cesium-137.

"The plume of cesium-137 resulting from the disaster is expected to reach the northwest coast of the U.S. early next year, but at levels safe for health." 

A powerful current passing near Japan, the Kuroshio has diluted the radioactivity.

The Pacific continues this process of dilution.


Researchers predict rates of between 10 and 30 becquerels per cubic meter (Bq / m3 ) on the coast of Oregon and Washington between 2014 and 2020, and between 10 and 20 Bq / m 3 in California between 2016 and 2025.



This graph shows the concentrations of cesium-137 in the ocean surface (between 0 - 200 meters) in April 2012 (a), April 2014 (b) April 2016 (c) and April 2021 (d).

"These rates, which are about ten times higher than before the Fukushima disaster, are still very low. 

"They present no danger to wildlife and consumption of seafood", says Dominique Boust of Laboratory Radioecology Cherbourg at the Institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN). 

"With an average of 20 Bq  per m 3 of water, we should find two becquerels in each kilogram of fresh fish, which is within the safe limits. The maximum allowable level in Europe is 500 Bq / kg."

le monde / Le blog de Wendy



Timothy1954 comments:

1. That's one isotope of one element, cesium 137. And levels have been higher than ten times above normal, earlier in this crisis. (much higher)

2. Cesium 137, cesium 134, iodine 129, iodine 131, and tritium, are being produced still by the melted down cores of reactors 1 and 2. And they escape with water vapor or with flowing water.

3. These, and strontium 90, accumulate in living creatures.
The damage done from INTERNAL radiation is much greater than what you get from external sources.

4. The uranium and plutonium that has burned and become dust, is inhaled and is carcinogenic.

5. Chernobyl has killed a million people so far, and Fukushima was a hundred times worse, as of October 2011, said a Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution study.

6. Fukushima's reactors one and two, at least, are still fissioning in the ground, still adding to the contamination.

CanSpeccy comments:

At present only the Japanese appear to be exposed to a substantial dose of radiation from Fukushima.

However, if one of the spent fuel pools overheats and the fuel is vaporized, the hazard will go global. 


~~

http://www.globalresearch.ca/tepco-tore-down-the-natural-seawall-which-would-have-protected-fukushima-from-the-tsunami/5356808

http://www.globalresearch.ca/fukushima-japans-cut-price-nuclear-cleanup/5356796

http://www.globalresearch.ca/hard-times-in-fukushima/5356793  

13 comments:

Dublinmick said...

Strangely enough, I just posted something about this last night. Navajo has the answer.

http://dublinsmick.wordpress.com/2013/11/01/permission-to-recognize-fukushima-is-now-authorized-surveying-our-circumstances-is-like-reading-about-mu/#comment-15796

CanSpeccy said...

Good info. At present only the Japanese appear to be exposed to a substantial dose of radiation from Fukushima. However, if one of the spent fuel pools overheats and the fuel is vaporized, the hazard will go global.

Anonymous said...

Really? I am sorry but I suspect this. Common sense says otherwise, the Japenese people themselves are saying they are being lied to and shut out. Canada has high levels as well as Wa State as well as fish dying like crazy. Cancer is up, where do you expect it to go? It will land somewhere would it not? The US news lies to us on everything, they are silent on this, wouldn't they be jumping w joy sharing this news? They only hide truth. I get Science reports from other areas than our news and they differ as well. thank you

Timothy1954 said...

1. That's one isotope of one element, cesium 137. And levels have been higher than ten times above normal, earlier in this crisis. (much higher)

2. Cesium 137, cesium 134, iodine 129, iodine 131, and tritium, are being produced still by the melted down cores of reactors 1 and 2. And they escape with water vapor or with flowing water.

3. These, and strontium 90, accumulate in living creatures.
The damage done from INTERNAL radiation is much greater than what you get from external sources.

4. The uranium and plutonium that has burned and become dust, is inhaled and is carcinogenic.

5. Chernobyl has killed a million people so far, and Fukushima was a hundred times worse, as of October 2011, said a Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution study.

6. Fukushima's reactors one and two, at least, are still fissioning in the ground, still adding to the contamination.

dognamedblue said...

good to know
my sister has just gone to live in california, but I'm still annoying her by telling her to take the tablets

Anonymous said...

Go to Enenews for more credible information on Fukushima:

http://enenews.com/

Anonymous said...

Some detail on the released radio isotopes mentioned above.

The problem one is Cesium 137: This is because it has a half life of about 30 years. That means the radiation associated will halve in about 30 years.

The iodine isotopes have half lives of ~8 days. They will decay into Xenon-131. This is stable and harmless at these concentrations.

(Note: Back in 2011 it was observed that Xenon-133 had covered the US:

http://www.zerohedge.com/article/xenon-133-dispersion-animation-radionuclide-has-blanketed-entire-united-states

This indicates that there was (and perhaps still is) significant release of radioactive iodine into the atmosphere from the Fukushima site.

Health effects of Xenon-133 (half life ~5 days):

http://www.drugs.com/pro/xenon-xe-133-gas.html

http://enenews.com/study-radioactive-xenon-washington-450000-times-above-detection-levels-after-fukushima-persisted-weeks-chart
)

Cesium 134 has a half life of 2 years.

Prussian Blue can be used to treat exposure to Cesium. It binds to the metal in the body enabling it to be expelled.

Cesium decays to Barium.

http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxprofiles/tp24-c3.pdf

There do not appear to be any thorough studies on the long term exposure effects on humans related to Barium compounds.

Strontium-90 is another major contaminant which should not be ignored:

https://ajw.asahi.com/article/0311disaster/fukushima/AJ201310170060

This has a half life of about 28 years,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strontium-90

In living organisms, Strontium usually is concentrated in bone structures as organisms treat it like Calcium. This is primarily responsible for leukaemia resulting from nuclear accidents / weapons testing.

It is perhaps assumed that Strontium will sink to the bottom of the ocean: That assumption may be incorrect.

Strontium-90 decays to Yttrium-90

Yttrium-90 decays with 1/2 life of 64 hours to Zirconium-90, which is broadly stable.

Yttrium:
http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/html/pdf/yttrium90.pdf

Zirconium is relatively harmless:

http://hpschapters.org/northcarolina/NSDS/zirconium.pdf

Anonymous said...

The primary risk from radiation is from internalised isotopes. The risk model in use by the authorities probably underestimates the risk by a large margin.

The Health Effects of Exposure to Low
Doses of Ionizing Radiation
Regulators’ Edition: Brussels 2010

http://www.euradcom.org/2011/ecrr2010.pdf

How about Sellafield / Windscale ?

http://www.euradcom.org/images/riga2010/busby.pdf

Anonymous said...

Anonymous@1:08,

Thanks for the impressive useful background on the radiochemistry.

There an excellent article in Global Research also.

We really need cold, hard unbiased data about what's happening in Fukushima and about ecological and medical effects. Unfortunately, governments and media seem to treat the truth as an enemy. Illustrating this, the Japanese government months ago put ridiculous restrictions on the importing of geiger counters. As if it would stop the truth.

Reminded me: When I was in school, I saw pictures in Der Spiegel of German housewives using geiger counters to test tomatoes at the market. They didn't trust their government to tell them the truth then either.

---
"Now do you know what the Russian translation for wormwood is?"
---

We have to put this in context.

We are surrounded by materials that can cause damage to DNA and proteins and interfere with life-sustaining biochemical activities.

Even water. Innocent dihydrogen monoxide contains concentrations of hydroxyl radicals.

And simple granite tends to exude quantities of radioactive radon gas. This is taken into account in building practices in places with large granite outcrops, like Scotland.

Mostly this is not a big deal. We have clever enzymes that, out of the goodness of their little hearts, repair such damage. But like all machines they have their engineering limits.

Certain materials like certain plutonium or strontium isotopes just wreak irreparable havoc. Plutonium-239 even at very low concentrations is extremely poisonous. It has a half-life of 24,000 odd years. So plutonium atoms, unless removed, will blast your biochemistry until you die. And your mortal coil will remain radioactive thereafter.

Materials also have a half-life in the body in a biological sense. It normally takes a certain amount of time for toxins to be excreted from the body. The "half life" is mean time to get rid of half of the toxin.

However radionuclides can even be incorporated into the body, keeping them for a long time in the body. Like you say, strontium has the same valency as calcium, so it may well be absorbed into your bones. And sit there irradiating you. Nice.

The upside is your skeleton will glow in the dark, which is fun. The downside is you'll be dead. Probably from a painful, protracted cancer. Which not quite so fun.

What's true of us is true of other organisms. From phytoplankton to yellow-fin tuna.

And the higher you go up the food chain, the more these toxins are concentrated. Culminating in our human biomass. And most of these isotopes have almost zero natural abundance: they are entirely reactor-made, which means there has been no evolutionary adaptation to these toxins.

Also, the radionuclide pollution from Fukushima does not magically get uniformly distributed in the world's oceans. There are apparently concentrated streams of the stuff all the way to the west coast of America. Theoretically you could create computer models of the hydrodynamics but cold hard observation and measurement against a baseline is what you need.

Less speculation, less voodoo. And more cold hard observation.

---
"I don't believe in astrology."
"I'm not talking about astrology; I'm talking about astronomy."

Anonymous said...

Let's just step back a bit. Why do we even dig the uranium out of the ground in the first place?

We use energy inefficiently. And waste much of it manufacturing rubbish we don't need. And transporting it here and there. Then disposing of it.

The wonders of industrial civilization.

We'd be better off changing how we live, improving efficiency, and investing in renewables and local energy micro-production.

Then you have mad scientists like Teller, who lobbied for unnecessary and deranged uses of atomic energy, like Operation Chariot. And the kleptocratic owners of Rio Tinto are happy to oblige this sort of death wish.

On the other hand, Toby Gangale, an elder of the Mirrar people, traditional owners of Jabiluka, warned that the Djang had the power to kill all over the world. That we should leave it in the ground.
Today his daughter endeavours to protect others, including those very far removed from her own land. Like the people of Fukushima.

Maybe we can ask the people of Fukushima, or Nagasaki or Hiroshima, whose opinion they trust more.
The arrogant Teller or the meek Gangale?

We have to stop this suicidal insanity. If we keep having more Chernobyls and Fukushimas, we'll fast render more and more of our world permanently desolate.

We were meant to be vice regents of this world, not destroyers of it.

---
"Καὶ ὁ τρίτος ἄγγελος ἐσάλπισεν:"

Anonymous said...

THE SECRET HISTORY OF THE ATOMIC BOMB

WHY HIROSHIMA WAS DESTROYED


by Eustace C. Mullins June 1998

Excerpts:

THE JEWISH HELL-BOMB

The atomic bomb was developed at the Los Alamos Laboratories in New Mexico. The top secret project was called the Manhattan Project, because its secret director, Bernard Baruch, lived in Manhattan, as did many of the other principals. Baruch had chosen Maj. Gen. Leslie R. Groves to head the operation. He had previously built the Pentagon, and had a good reputation among the Washington politicians, who usually came when Baruch beckoned.

The scientific director at Los Alamos was J. Robert Oppenheimer, scion of a prosperous family of clothing merchants. In Oppenheimer; the Years Of Risk, by James Kunetka, Prentice Hall, NY, 1982, Kunetka writes, p. 106, "Baruch was especially interested in Oppenheimer for the position of senior scientific adviser." The project cost an estimated two billion dollars. No other nation in the world could have afforded to develop such a bomb. The first successful test of the atomic bomb occurred at the Trinity site, two hundred miles south of Los Alamos at 5:29:45 a.m. on July 16, 1945. Oppenheimer was beside himself at the spectacle. He shrieked, "I am become Death, the Destroyer of worlds." Indeed, this seemed to be the ultimate goal of the Manhattan Project, to destroy the world. There had been considerable fear among the scientists that the test explosion might indeed set off a chain reaction, which would destroy the entire world. Oppenheimer's exultation came from his realization that now his people had attained the ultimate power, through which they could implement their five-thousand-year desire to rule the entire world.

Read the rest:

http://www.whale.to/b/mullins8.html

Anonymous said...

anon@2:49
---------

important post . . . still hidden

another J bbomb:

chertoff as the b.baruch of the 21stCentury

another totally-closed 0ppen?heim-0p
again global
wot . . .

Anonymous said...

another useless Fuku article. there is no "safe" level of rad ingestion. Reactor #3 was a full plutonium nuke explosion and THREE complete corium meldowns- all going into the Pacific Ocean undeterred for nearly 3 yrs now. With 400+ tons of new highly radiated water runoff from underground rivers DAILY. Fuku is atop rivers that cant be stopped.
but its all "no problem" and will be diluted. Rads dont disperse they bioACCUMULATE exponentially- and the dumping is infinite into a FINITE marine receptacle, the Pacific. very disappointed this usually great site would trivialize what is certainly an ELE event. odd.

 
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