Wednesday, July 04, 2007

Classic Double Agents in False Flag Operations

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Apparently the British government sometimes kills off its own agents. Consider the case of Catesby, Percy and Tresham.

King James I's spymaster, Robert Cecil, blackmailed Robert Catesby into organising a plot to discredit Catholics.

In 1604, Robert Catesby, an agent of the British government, was involved in the planning of the Gunpowder plot, a scheme to pretend to blow up the British parliament on the 5th November 1605 and kill King James.

On his death-bed, there were statements by Robert Catesby's servant that Robert Cecil and Catesby met on three separate occasions in the period leading up to the events of the night of 5 November 1605.

At a meeting at the Duck and Drake Inn, Catesby explained his plan to Guy Fawkes, Thomas Percy, an agent of the British government, John Wright and Thomas Wintour. All of them agreed to join the plot.

In the following months Francis Tresham, an agent of the British government, Everard Digby, Robert Wintour, Thomas Bates, and Christopher Wright also agreed to join the conspiracy.

Prior to the plot, Thomas Percy was seen coming out of the house of Robert Cecil.

Confession made under torture?

After the plot was 'discovered', Catesby, Percy, Christopher Wright and John Wright headed to a house outside London, Holbeche House in Staffordshire. On the 8th November 1605, government troops arrived at the house and shot dead the conspirators: Robert Catesby, Thomas Percy, Christopher Wright and John Wright.

Digby, Robert Wintour, Thomas Wintour, Bates and Fawkes were executed in January 1606.

It was widely rumoured that Francis Tresham was poisoned while being held captive in the Tower of london.

In his book The Gunpowder Plot: The Narrative of Oswald Tessimond, Francis Edwards claims that Francis Tesham escaped from the Tower of London, probably with the help of the Government, went abroad, and changed his name to Matthew Bruninge.

R. Crampton, in the book The Gunpowder Plot (1990) explained:

"If Guy Fawkes case came up before the Court of Appeal today, the... judges would surely... acquit him... First no one has ever seen the attempted tunnel. Builders excavating the area in 1823 found neither a tunnel nor any rubble. Second, the gunpowder. In 1605, the Government had a monopoly on its manufacture... The Government did not display the gunpowder and nobody saw it in the cellars. Third, these cellars were rented by the government to a known Catholic agitator... Fourth, the Tresham letter. Graphologists (handwriting experts) agree that it was not written by Francis Tresham."

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